CONCYTEC

 

CONCYTEC

Coronavirus COVID-19
Publicaciones seleccionadas
por el CONCYTEC
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ABSTRACT
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, countries have sought to control SARS-CoV-2 transmission by restricting population movement through social distancing interventions, thus reducing the number of contacts. Mobility data represent an important proxy measure of social distancing, and here, we characterise the relationship between transmission and mobility for 52 countries around the world. Transmission significantly decreased with the initial reduction in mobility in 73% of the countries analysed, but we found evidence of decoupling of transmission and mobility following the relaxation of strict control measures for 80% of countries. For the majority of countries, mobility explained a substantial proportion of the variation in transmissibility (median adjusted R-squared: 48%, interquartile range - IQR - across countries [27–77%]). Where a change in the relationship occurred, predictive ability decreased after the relaxation; from a median adjusted R-squared of 74% (IQR across countries [49–91%]) pre-relaxation, to a median adjusted R-squared of 30% (IQR across countries [12–48%]) post-relaxation. In countries with a clear relationship between mobility and transmission both before and after strict control measures were relaxed, mobility was associated with lower transmission rates after control measures were relaxed indicating that the beneficial effects of ongoing social distancing behaviours were substantial.
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ABSTRACT
The COVID‐19 pandemic led to potential delays in diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, which may negatively affect the prognosis of these patients. This study aimed to quantify the impact of COVID‐19 on the short‐term survival of cancer patients by comparing a period of four months after the outbreak began (2 March 2020) with an equal period from 2019. All cancer cases of the esophagus, stomach, colon and rectum, pancreas, lung, skin‐melanoma, breast, cervix, and prostate, from the Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO‐Porto) and diagnosed between 2 March and 1 July of 2019 (before COVID‐19) and 2020 (after COVID‐19) were identified. Information regarding sociodemographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were collected from the cancer registry database and clinical files. Vital status was assessed to 31 October of the respective years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate crude and propensity score‐adjusted hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of death. During follow‐up to October 31, there were 154 (11.8%) deaths observed before COVID‐19 and 131 (17.2%) after COVID‐19, corresponding to crude and adjusted HRs (95%CI) of 1.51 (1.20‐1.91) and 1.10 (0.86‐1.40), respectively. Significantly higher adjusted hazards of death were observed for patients with stage III cancer (HR=2.37; 95%C:1.14‐4.94) and those undergoing surgical treatment (HR=3.97; 95%CI:1.14‐13.77), while patients who did not receive any treatment had a lower mortality hazards (HR=0.62; 95%CI:0.46‐0.83). The higher overall short‐term mortality observed during the COVID‐19 pandemic largely reflects the effects of the epidemic on the case‐mix of patients being diagnosed with cancer.
libro_01_03_3.png
ABSTRACT
The COVID‐19 pandemic led to potential delays in diagnosis and treatment of cancer patients, which may negatively affect the prognosis of these patients. This study aimed to quantify the impact of COVID‐19 on the short‐term survival of cancer patients by comparing a period of four months after the outbreak began (2 March 2020) with an equal period from 2019. All cancer cases of the esophagus, stomach, colon and rectum, pancreas, lung, skin‐melanoma, breast, cervix, and prostate, from the Portuguese Oncology Institute of Porto (IPO‐Porto) and diagnosed between 2 March and 1 July of 2019 (before COVID‐19) and 2020 (after COVID‐19) were identified. Information regarding sociodemographic, clinical and treatment characteristics were collected from the cancer registry database and clinical files. Vital status was assessed to 31 October of the respective years. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate crude and propensity score‐adjusted hazards ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) of death. During follow‐up to October 31, there were 154 (11.8%) deaths observed before COVID‐19 and 131 (17.2%) after COVID‐19, corresponding to crude and adjusted HRs (95%CI) of 1.51 (1.20‐1.91) and 1.10 (0.86‐1.40), respectively. Significantly higher adjusted hazards of death were observed for patients with stage III cancer (HR=2.37; 95%C:1.14‐4.94) and those undergoing surgical treatment (HR=3.97; 95%CI:1.14‐13.77), while patients who did not receive any treatment had a lower mortality hazards (HR=0.62; 95%CI:0.46‐0.83). The higher overall short‐term mortality observed during the COVID‐19 pandemic largely reflects the effects of the epidemic on the case‐mix of patients being diagnosed with cancer.
 

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